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MITOTAX 100 MG INJ ( PC , 1 )

Manufactured by: Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd

. 1512.00/- . 4076.00/- 62.90 % OFF You Save : . 2564.00/-
Availability : In stock

DESCRIPTION

Paclitaxel is a mitotic inhibitor used in cancer chemotherapy. It was discovered in a US National Cancer Institute program at the Research Triangle Institute in 1967 when Monroe E. Wall and Mansukh C. Wani isolated it from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, Taxus brevifolia and named it taxol. Later it was discovered that endophytic fungi in the bark synthesize paclitaxel. When it was developed commercially by Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS), the generic name was changed to paclitaxel and the BMS compound is sold under the trademark Taxol. In this formulation, paclitaxel is dissolved in Kolliphor EL and ethanol, as a delivery agent. A newer formulation, in which paclitaxel is bound to albumin, is sold under the trademark Abraxane. [Wikipedia]

CATEGORIES

Antineoplastic Agents Immunosuppressive Agents Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic Tubulin Modulators Antineoplastic and Immunomodulating Agents Taxanes Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9 Inhibitors Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C8 Inhibitors Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9 Inducers Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C8 Inducers CYP3A4 Inhibitors BSEP/ABCB11 Inhibitors Combined Inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein

CHEMICAL FORMULA

C47H51NO14

COMPOSITION

Paclitaxel 100 MG

INDICATION

Used in the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma and cancer of the lung, ovarian, and breast. Abraxane® is specfically indicated for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

PHARMACODYNAMICS

Paclitaxel is a taxoid antineoplastic agent indicated as first-line and subsequent therapy for the treatment of advanced carcinoma of the ovary, and other various cancers including breast cancer. Paclitaxel is a novel antimicrotubule agent that promotes the assembly of microtubules from tubulin dimers and stabilizes microtubules by preventing depolymerization. This stability results in the inhibition of the normal dynamic reorganization of the microtubule network that is essential for vital interphase and mitotic cellular functions. In addition, paclitaxel induces abnormal arrays or "bundles" of microtubules throughout the cell cycle and multiple asters of microtubules during mitosis.

MECHANISM

Paclitaxel interferes with the normal function of microtubule growth. Whereas drugs like colchicine cause the depolymerization of microtubules in vivo, paclitaxel arrests their function by having the opposite effect; it hyper-stabilizes their structure. This destroys the cell's ability to use its cytoskeleton in a flexible manner. Specifically, paclitaxel binds to the ß subunit of tubulin. Tubulin is the "building block" of mictotubules, and the binding of paclitaxel locks these building blocks in place. The resulting microtubule/paclitaxel complex does not have the ability to disassemble. This adversely affects cell function because the shortening and lengthening of microtubules (termed dynamic instability) is necessary for their function as a transportation highway for the cell. Chromosomes, for example, rely upon this property of microtubules during mitosis. Further research has indicated that paclitaxel induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in cancer cells by binding to an apoptosis stopping protein called Bcl-2 (B-cell leukemia 2) and thus arresting its function.

ABSORPTION

When a 24 hour infusion of 135 mg/m^2 is given to ovarian cancer patients, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) is 195 ng/mL, while the AUC is 6300 ng•h/mL.

VOLUME DISTRIBUTION

227 to 688 L/m^2 [apparent volume of distribution at steady-state, 24 hour infusion]

METABOLISM

Hepatic. In vitro studies with human liver microsomes and tissue slices showed that paclitaxel was metabolized primarily to 6a-hydrox-ypaclitaxel by the cytochrome P450 isozyme CYP2C8; and to two minor metabolites, 3’-p-hydroxypaclitaxel and 6a, 3’-p-dihydroxypaclitaxel, by CYP3A4.

ROUTE ELIMINATION

In 5 patients administered a 225 or 250 mg/m2 dose of radiolabeled paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion, a mean of 71% of the radioactivity was excreted in the feces in 120 hours, and 14% was recovered in the urine.

HALF LIFE

When a 24 hour infusion of 135 mg/m^2 is given to ovarian cancer patients, the elimination half=life is 52.7 hours.

TOXICITY

Rat (ipr) LD50=32530 µg/kg. Symptoms of overdose include bone marrow suppression, peripheral neurotoxicity, and mucositis. Overdoses in pediatric patients may be associated with acute ethanol toxicity.

FOOD INTERACTIONS

Avoid echinacea. Avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice due to potential increase of paclitaxel.

SIDE EFFECTS

Chance of getting an infection. Wash hands often. Stay away from people with infections, colds, or flu. Fever, chills, itching, hives, chest pain or pressure, or shortness of breath when drug is given. Other drugs may be given to avoid these. Anemia, low white blood cell count, and low platelet count. Feeling tired or weak. Upset stomach or throwing up. Loose stools (diarrhea). Mouth and lip irritation. Using a soft toothbrush or cotton swabs and rinsing the mouth may help. Do not use mouth rinses that have alcohol in them. Hair loss. Hair most often grows back when this drug is stopped. Flushing. Swelling. Numbness and tingling. Muscle or joint pain. May not be able to get pregnant.